S. Carolina


South Carolina Wine Overview

The wine industry in South Carolina is small. Traditional wine grapes struggle here due to high humidity levels. As a result, most locally made South Carolina wine is either a Muscadine style or made from fruits that do well here like blackberries, raspberries and peaches. One unique grape that is grown in South Carolina is the Lenoir grape, also called the Black Spanish grape, which is native to Texas. The Lenoir has a very dark skin, and wine made from these grapes has hints of raspberry and black cherry.

One unique grape that is grown in South Carolina is the Lenoir grape, also called the Black Spanish grape, which is native to Texas. The Lenoir has a very dark skin, and wine made from these grapes has hints of raspberry and black cherry.

South Carolina wineries are hoping a new law will invigorate sales — the new law allows winemakers in the state to use a higher percentage of fruit from other states. Previously, South Carolina wineries were allowed to use up to 49% out-of-state fruit in their wines. The percentage has been raised to 60% in a move designed to overcome what winery owners felt was a competitive disadvantage. Here at WineTrailsUSA, we have always been advocates of wineries using local fruit and local grapes so consumers get a true distinction of an area’s wines. But if the new law benefits wineries and other small businesses, economic issues certainly outweigh personal preference.

Here’s a list of several South Carolina wineries:
Victoria Valley Vineyards, in Cleveland, S.C.
September Oaks Vineyard in Ridgeland, near Hilton Head
La Belle Amie Vineyard in Little River, near the North Carolina border
Island Winery in Hilton Head
Irvin House Vineyards, just outside of Charleston
Enoree River Winery, in Newberry, located mid-state west of Columbia
Carolina Vineyards, in North Myrtle Beach

South Carolina Wine Trail

With a small number of wineries spread throughout the state, South Carolina doesn’t have a wine trail — and it’s unlikely that one will be formed unless the wine industry here expands.

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